Outdoor Workers at High Risk of Skin Cancer

outdoor workers

More than two million outdoor workers are not being provided with any sun protection by their employers, according to the 2017 Skin Health Australia Report Card.

In a national population survey, 45 percent of respondents were required to work outdoors sometimes, regularly or all the time. Fifty-seven percent of these people said their employers did not supply sunscreen, while 66 percent did not supply protective clothing and 80 percent did not supply sunglasses. Continue reading “Outdoor Workers at High Risk of Skin Cancer”

Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?

elderly patients

In very elderly patients, less aggressive skin cancers on the faces might not always need to be treated, according to a study in the US. Research suggests that the age and relative lifespan of the patient should be taken into consideration when deliberating treatment for slow-growing non-melanoma skin cancer on the face.

In a study published in JAMA Surgery, researchers said that there are multiple ways to treat non-melanoma skin cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and that the decision to treat them should take into account the patient’s lifestyle, needs and wishes. Researchers also advised that patients need to understand what the course of the cancer usually is. Continue reading “Do skin cancers on elderly patients always need to be treated?”

Proportion of Melanomas Managed by GPs in Australia

melanomas managed by GPs

This month, we have a really interesting and relevant research letter to review and consider, concerning the proportion of melanomas managed by GPs in Australia. This was published in the Australasian Journal of Dermatology by Wu et al. I noted it in part because it referenced some research that I did a decade ago (how time flies)! The authors used Medicare billing data to look at trends in melanoma excision over time across Australia. Continue reading “Proportion of Melanomas Managed by GPs in Australia”

How does early life sun exposure affect skin cancer risk?

risk

How does sun exposure in early life affect risk of developing basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas?

Sun exposure is the main cause of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas, although pattern and amount differ by cancer type. Sun sensitivity is the major risk factor.

A study published in the Photochemistry and Photobiology journal investigated the risk factors and residential ambient UV in a population-based sample of Australians. The cohort included 916 basal cell carcinomas, 433 squamous cell carcinomas, and 1,224 controls. Continue reading “How does early life sun exposure affect skin cancer risk?”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [January 2018]

Skin Cancer Update

A multi-centre study has explored the prevalence of melanoma on hairy scalps in comparison to bald scalps. Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano explains in this skin cancer update video that – while around 76 percent of scalp melanomas are found on people with thinning or no hair – a quarter appear on people with hairy scalps.

Scalp melanoma can be aggressive and has a poorer prognosis compared to melanoma found elsewhere on the body, because scalp melanoma is generally thicker at the time of diagnosis. It also looks different depending on where it is located on the scalp itself, making it trickier to identify. Continue reading “Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [January 2018]”

Detecting Thin Melanoma

thin melanoma

Although the risk of relapse of patients with thin melanoma is regraded low, a significant and steadily increasing proportion of early-stage cutaneous melanoma patients relapse and die of their melanoma. In fact, 25 percent of mortality is caused by cutaneous melanomas smaller than 1 millimetre in thickness. These high-risk patients cannot be detected, so far, by conventional prognostic methods.

At the 9th World Congress of Melanoma and 14th International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research, a team of German scientists presented research to address this problem. They had previously identified a prognostic gene signature expressed in cutaneous melanoma and adjacent stroma. A validated signature-based gene expression risk score predicts patient survival and need for adjuvant therapy. Continue reading “Detecting Thin Melanoma”

BRAF Mutation Associated With Central Nervous System Metastasis in Melanoma Patients

central nervous system metastasis

BRAF mutation is associated with sentinel lymph node positivity and central nervous system metastasis in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma, according to new research.

The findings were presented at the 9th World Congress of Melanoma and 14th International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research.

A cohort of 1,544 patients with primary cutaneous melanoma were analysed to determine whether BRAF-mutant, NRAS-mutant and wild-type tumours differ in their sites of visceral metastasis. Continue reading “BRAF Mutation Associated With Central Nervous System Metastasis in Melanoma Patients”

Cutaneous Lymphomas: New Therapies in Development

cutaneous lymphomas

Modern therapies for cutaneous lymphomas were a topic of discussion at the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology 2017 Congress, which was held in Geneva in September 2017. Continue reading “Cutaneous Lymphomas: New Therapies in Development”

Does ultrasound-based follow-up improve survival of melanoma patients?

ultrasound-based follow-up

Does ultrasound-based follow-up improve survival outcomes of patients with stage 1-2 melanoma? A study in the European Journal of Cancer compared the efficacy of an ultrasound-based follow-up with a clinical follow-up to determine whether ultrasonography of the regional lymph nodes and abdomen improves melanoma-specific survival.

Different protocols have been used to follow up melanoma patients in stage 1-2 but there is no consensus on the complementary tests that should be requested, or the appropriate intervals between visits. Continue reading “Does ultrasound-based follow-up improve survival of melanoma patients?”

How does a family history of melanoma impact patients with multiple primary melanomas?

night shift workers

How does a family history of melanoma affect the risk of developing subsequent skin cancers in patients with multiple primary melanomas?

It has been noted that patients with multiple primary melanomas have worse outcomes than those with single primary melanomas. Continue reading “How does a family history of melanoma impact patients with multiple primary melanomas?”