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Submit your cases

In the blog category “Case Studies” Professor David Wilkinson offers an excellent platform to discuss clinical problems and cases within a closed alumni community. This area is password-protected and only accessible to past UQ Skin Cancer Certificate course participants.

We encourage you to submit clinical images and questions so we can all learn together.

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Lack of Canberra Dermatologists Forces Melanoma Patients To Travel Interstate

dermatologists

Canberra residents with serious skin problems, including people with melanoma, are being forced to travel to New South Wales to see dermatologists due to a shortage of specialists and lengthy waiting times in the nation’s capital. The Australasian College of Dermatologists reports that GPs in Canberra are not referring their patients to local dermatologists because […]

Slowing Down Cancer with Immunotherapy Breakthrough

immunotherapy

One of the greatest hurdles in our fight against cancer can be our own immune system, as it often self-sabotages the body’s attempts to fight invading tumours. Researchers from the University of Bonn have recently found a way to get around this immune response, using immunotherapy to achieve a significant delay in cancer growth, which […]

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [23 October]

Case discussion_Slavko DOslo

This week we have a great case from Dr Slavko Doslo. A 65-year-old female presented for a Skin check and a lesion was noticed as indicated. What is your assessment of the clinical and dermoscopic images? What would you do – if anything?

Men Over 55 At High Risk Of Skin Cancer

risk of skin cancer

Queensland men aged over 55 are at the highest risk of skin cancer, new research shows. For the first time, researchers at QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have measured the rates of non-melanoma skin cancers among the adult population, and found that the vast majority of such cancers are diagnosed on older men, particularly from […]

Recommended Minimum Surgical Margin to Remove Skin Cancer

Merkel cell carcinoma

A surgical margin of at least two millimetres around a cancerous skin lesion is the minimum requirement to ensure total removal of cancer cells and to avoid the need for further surgeries, according to a study by researchers at Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health. The results of a study enlisting 138 skin cancer […]

How to Close Wounds on Paper Thin Skin

In this short video, experienced skin cancer doctor Colin Armstrong demonstrates how to use steri-strips for wound closures on thin skin, particularly on elderly patients.

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [16 October]

Case discussion Slavko

This week we have an interesting case from Dr Slavko Doslo. A 40-year-old female presented for a skin check and a lesion was noticed on her back. What is your assessment of the clinical and dermoscopic images? What would you do – if anything?

Accuracy of Pathology Diagnosis of Melanoma

Merkel cell carcinoma

Our paper this month comes from Elmore et al, published in the BMJ. The authors set out to determine the accuracy and reproducibility of pathology diagnosis of melanocytic skin lesions. The study was done across the USA and included 240 skin biopsies, and almost 200 pathologists viewed the slides twice, eight months apart.

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [October]

skin cancer update

In this skin cancer update video, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses the revolutionary results of a study comparing lymph-node dissection with observation in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Of patients who had a positive sentinel-node biopsy, the study compared the outcomes of patients who underwent complete lymph-node dissection with the outcomes of patients who were just […]

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [09 October]

Case discussion_Slavko

This week we have another fabulous case from Dr Colin Armstrong. An 80-year-old female presented for a skin check and a lonely lesion was noticed on the calf as indicated. What is your assessment of the clinical and dermoscopic images? What would you do – if anything?

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