Recommended Minimum Surgical Margin to Remove Skin Cancer

Merkel cell carcinoma

A surgical margin of at least two millimetres around a cancerous skin lesion is the minimum requirement to ensure total removal of cancer cells and to avoid the need for further surgeries, according to a study by researchers at Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health.

The results of a study enlisting 138 skin cancer patients was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, and found that excising a two millimetre margin beyond the edges of a suspicious mole was best practice for complete removal.

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How to Close Wounds on Paper Thin Skin

In this short video, experienced skin cancer doctor Colin Armstrong demonstrates how to use steri-strips for wound closures on thin skin, particularly on elderly patients. Continue reading “How to Close Wounds on Paper Thin Skin”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [October]

skin cancer update

In this skin cancer update video, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses the revolutionary results of a study comparing lymph-node dissection with observation in patients with advanced metastatic melanoma. Of patients who had a positive sentinel-node biopsy, the study compared the outcomes of patients who underwent complete lymph-node dissection with the outcomes of patients who were just observed after a positive sentinel-node biopsy and did not undergo a dissection.

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How to Use the Principle of Hydrodissection in Skin Cancer Surgery

If you perform skin cancer surgery in your practice, you might be interested to see the 1-minute video below with experienced skin cancer doctor Hamilton Ayres. Dr Ayres uses the principle of hydrodissection to remove a lesion on a patient’s ear. The injected fluid helps to separate the tissue planes and facilitates excision. Continue reading “How to Use the Principle of Hydrodissection in Skin Cancer Surgery”

Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [4 September]

This week we have another engaging case discussion from Dr Slavko Doslo. A 76-year-old patient presented for ROS.

What do you think of this clinical image? What is your impression? (Ignore the adjacent scar).

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A Quick Guide to Pivotal Flaps [Part 1]

Pivotal flaps can be a preferable excision method for lesions which can’t be excised using an ellipse. However this method requires a great degree of planning as considerable tension may be present and extensive undermining needed to close the excision without tension. In the short video below (Part I), surgical lecturer Tony Dicker demonstrates how to plan and perform a pivotal flap with optimal outcomes. This is a video sample from the Professional Certificate of Skin Cancer SurgeryContinue reading “A Quick Guide to Pivotal Flaps [Part 1]”

Skin Cancer Update with A/Prof Giuseppe Argenziano [August]

Melanoma

In this skin cancer update, Associate Professor Giuseppe Argenziano discusses the findings of a study from May 2017 about the accuracy of pathologists’ diagnoses of melanoma.

The study found that the accuracy and reproducibility of the pathologists’ results were very low – in some cases, accuracy was just 25 percent.

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Case discussion: How would you treat this patient? [7 August]

Case discussion_Slavko Doslo

This week we have another case discussion from Dr Slavko Doslo. It is about an elderly man presenting for reasons unrelated to his skin. A full skin check is done and these clinical and dermoscopic images are taken. How do you evaluate them?

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Acral and Mucosal Melanomas Completely Distinct from Skin Melanoma

acral and mucosal melanomas

Genetic changes in melanomas on the hands and feet (acral) and internal surfaces (mucosal) are completely different to the mutations found in skin melanoma, according to a study forming part of the Australian Melanoma Genome Project. The findings confirm the diseases as being very distinct from each other.

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Melanoma Treatments: Early Findings of Three Clinical Trials

immunotherapy

The American Society of Clinical Oncology recently brought together around 30,000 oncology professionals for its annual meeting, which this year focused on the latest research in melanoma treatments. Of particular interest were the findings of a number of recent studies and clinical trials that tested the safety and efficacy of various skin cancer treatments.

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